Effect of graduated compression stockings on venous lower limb hemodynamics in healthy amateur runners

Castilho Junior, Oswaldo Teno et al.
Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders , Volume 6 , Issue 1 , 83 – 89

Objective

The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of graduated compression stockings (GCS) on venous lower limb hemodynamics in healthy amateur runners.

Methods

Ten runners were evaluated during rest and after a 10-km run without and with knee-high GCS of 20 to 30 mm Hg. Air plethysmography evaluated venous filling index (VFI), ejection fraction, and residual volume fraction (RVF) in both limbs. Capillary lactate level and heart rate were also measured.

Results

Right VFI was 1.38 mL/s during rest, 1.98 mL/s without compression, and 1.32 mL/s with compression (P = .006). Left VFI was 1.35 mL/s during rest, 1.64 mL/s without compression, and 1.21 mL/s with compression (P = .006). In both limbs, ejection fraction was not different in the three situations. Right RVF was 22.35% during rest, 19.40% without compression, and 10.50% with compression (P = .006). Left RVF was similar in all situations. Capillary lactate level increased in runners without compression (P = .004) but kept stable in those wearing compression. The difference between after-run and before-run capillary lactate levels was similar in runners with and without compression. Rest, peak, and after-run heart rates were similar in runners with and without compression.

Conclusions

Healthy amateur runners had associated hemodynamic improvements when wearing knee-high GCS of 20 to 30 mm Hg during a 10-km treadmill run. VFI dropped in both limbs and RVF dropped at least in the right limb. There was no positive effect on calf muscle pump; capillary lactate variation; or rest, peak, and after-run heart rates.

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